icm2re logo. icm2:re (I Changed My Mind Reviewing Everything) is an 

ongoing web column edited and published by Brunella Longo

This column deals with some aspects of change management processes experienced almost in any industry impacted by the digital revolution: how to select, create, gather, manage, interpret, share data and information either because of internal and usually incremental scope - such learning, educational and re-engineering processes - or because of external forces, like mergers and acquisitions, restructuring goals, new regulations or disruptive technologies.

The title - I Changed My Mind Reviewing Everything - is a tribute to authors and scientists from different disciplinary fields that have illuminated my understanding of intentional change and decision making processes during the last thirty years, explaining how we think - or how we think about the way we think. The logo is a bit of a divertissement, from the latin divertere that means turn in separate ways.

Chronological Index | Subject Index

Take care of your bacteria

Do scientists and GPs have the right information to fight antibiotics resistance?

How to cite this article?
Longo, Brunella (2015). Take care of your bacteria. Do scientists and GPs have the right information to fight antibiotics resistance? icm2re [I Changed my Mind Reviewing Everything ISSN 2059-688X (Print)], 4.5 (May).

How to cite this article?
Longo, Brunella (2015). Take care of your bacteria. Do scientists and GPs have the right information to fight antibiotics resistance? icm2re [I Changed my Mind Reviewing Everything ISSN 2059-688X (Online)], 4.5 (May).
Full-text accessible at http://www.brunellalongo.co.uk/

London May 27th - With a new holistic approach, a professor of health system economics at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Richard Smith, writes in the latest issue of the BMJ that the fight against antimicrobial resistance should be reshaped and considered as a social problem, not just as a technological and biological phenomenon (Antimicrobial resistance requires a social solution, BMJ2015; 350:h2682).

He also appreciates the emphasis put by Research Councils UK on the need to develop new rapid diagnostic tools, that is a critical point to address humans and animals infections properly, but insists on the need to opening up the debate and looking into processes other than the biological mechanisms. This should be the way to engage with other scientists and specialists and contribute to a new interdisciplinary approach, focussing on changing patients behaviours. The idea was validated last year by an ESRC Working Group that has produced a report (Anti-Microbial Resistance: Setting the Social Science Agenda, July 2014). It seems also aligned to the current cross-disciplinary fascination for behavioural economics.

It is, indeed, a fascinating case of dealing with change.

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